Make, Munch and Mulch this Halloween

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shutterstock_173865542You may have picked up on this, but I think recycling is brilliant! Sometimes, though, there are even better ways to deal with our rubbish, especially garden and food waste. A lot of the stuff we send off in our garden waste white sacks/brown bins and green food waste caddies is actually really useful.

Take pumpkins. This Halloween, 18,000 tons of the big orange squashes will be thrown away after a hard night’s work scaring people, but they can do so much more. Follow my easy three-step guide to make the most of yours:

Make your jack o’lantern, scooping out the flesh and seeds and putting them to one side.

Munch on the delicious insides of the vegetable. Pumpkin soup is lovely with a little spice, as is American-style pumpkin pie…mmm. We always give a little bit of the flesh to my son’s guinea pig Marcel too. I wash the seeds and toast them with a little chilli for a crunchy, healthy snack, but if you like, you could save them and grow your own pumpkins for next year!
Once Halloween is over and the lantern starts to sag…

Moulder it down in your compost bin, if you have one, or chop it up and put it in your food waste caddy. If it’s too big, just leave it on top of or next to the caddy. In Colchester, food waste is collected every week on your normal collection day, so it won’t be there for long! Any leftover Halloween party nibbles will go in the caddy too.

Pumpkins would be nothing without an autumn backdrop of orange and red leaves. My driveway is already covered in them!

I rake them up and, once my son has jumped in them for a bit, I turn them into leaf mulch. It’s like a warm blanket for the roots in your garden, keeping them protected through the frosty winter to come. It’s easy to do:

Make a big pile of leaves and keep them as dry as possible to make shredding them easier.

Munch them up using a lawnmower. Chopping the leaves turns them into… 

Mulch, which you can spread straight away underneath trees and shrubs. It will insulate them from the cold weather, prevent weeds growing and, eventually, rot down into nutrients for the soil.
I can’t believe I used to throw away such useful stuff. Try it yourself – if you don’t have a compost bin, you can get discounted ones at https://getcomposting.com.

If your pumpkin is part of your Halloween party decor, don’t forget you can recycle other things too! Think paper plates (in your paper clear recycling bag), sweet wrappers (either paper or plastic clear recycling bag), old Halloween costumes (in your textile clear recycling bag or give them to charity). All of these are collected on a Green Week.

Have a wicked Halloween, everyone… and keeeeep recycling (we’re back in Strictly Come Dancing season now)!

Squirrel away your garden waste

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As the days get shorter, my garden is suddenly very popular with squirrels. Watching them bound about, gathering acorns and storing them up, got me thinking about how we humans prepare for winter.

If your garden is anything like mine, autumn is a super busy time. Collecting windfall fruit, raking leaves, dead-heading and putting the plants to bed… it’s the last big push before the frost starts!

All this garden activity means our bins and sacks are stuffed full. Every collection, you can put out four white garden waste sacks, or one brown wheelie bin with the lid closed, for recycling.

Even better, you could compost it at home – that way, all the energy put into those plants during the summer goes back into your own garden! It also means the waste doesn’t need to be transported, so there are no CO2 emissions. Take a leaf from the squirrels’ book and save some of the season’s bounty for yourself.

Already a keen composter? This is the time of year to turf out all the lovely goodness in your compost bin and dig it into your garden. That’ll give you plenty of space to squirrel away more compost throughout the winter.

If you don’t have a compost bin yet, good news – householders in Colchester can get a discounted compost bin for under £10 from Essex County Council. You can order them at www.getcomposting.com.  Buy two bins and you’ll get a third one free, so it’s worth clubbing together with a couple of neighbours!

I used to fill up my four white sacks in autumn, but since discovering composting almost everything goes into my mulch. If you need some, though, you can now get up to four free of charge. All you need to do is download a voucher from www.colchester.gov.uk/recycling and take it to a local stockist.

To make sure your winter compost is of the very best quality, follow my top tips:

  • Keep it toasty – the tiny creatures that turn waste into compost don’t like the cold, so wrap your compost bin up warm! I’m not suggesting you buy it a scarf, but some snuggly leftover bubble wrap from a delivery or bags of leaves should do the trick.
  • Layer it – the key to great compost is to layer browns (dry, woody stuff like old leaves and sawdust) and greens (wet, recently-alive stuff like food scraps and grass cuttings). You’ll want about half of each.
  • Leave it alone – during summer, compost should be turned to get air into it. In winter, this can make it cold, so keep turning minimal.

In the spring, you’ll be able to kick-start your garden’s growth with some wonderful, rich compost. Your garden will thank you – and so will our environment!