Don’t be an Easter waster… recycle your egg packaging!

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Before we start, I want to make you a promise. 
This blog post contains absolutely no ‘hilarious’ egg puns.
Read on. It’s safe.

We all know how much packaging most Easter eggs come in. Foil wrappers, inside plastic shells, inside cardboard boxes… all for a thin chocolate shape full of air!

Kids love making things from the parts. My son made the plastic mould from his into an impressive aquarium last year, filling it with scrap-paper fish hanging from strings and pipecleaner foliage. We’ve still got it – but of course, you can’t keep 
all that packaging around the house forever.

You can, however, recycle it all! 

Foil can be put in your green box with the cans – it doesn’t matter if it’s scrunched up or folded, because a machine will hammer it all out into something that can be processed and reused. 

The plastic moulds, like most plastic packaging, can go into your clear recycling bag with… you got it… the plastics! And the cardboard can, of course, be recycled in a clear bag with the rest of your card. 

That’s all pretty simple and easy – we always recycle all the packaging from our Easter eggs and although we grumble about how excessive it is, at least it’s going to be turned back into something useful. Easter is all about new life, after all, and that plastic could go on to become anything from a home composter to a fleece jacket.

But I’m not here to tell you the basic stuff! 

To keep your black bins and bags as clear as your environmental conscience, follow my advanced tips for cutting down on waste this Easter:

Freezer feaster

Family coming round for a roast dinner over the bank holiday? Remember to freeze the scraps – there are tons of amazing recipes on Love Food Hate Waste which will save your wallet, waistline and waste-line. Plastic meat trays, vegetable packaging and foil can all be rinsed and recycled.

Eager taster

Scoffed an entire selection box of chocolates in a weekend? Don’t worry, you’re not alone! Those little boxes with the segmented trays make fantastic storage for small items like beads, screws and jewellery parts. They’re also great as palettes for mixing paint. If all else fails, the plastic and cardboard parts can be separated and recycled in a matter of seconds.

Creature keeper

Bunnies aren’t a good Easter present. They’re not easy pets and they take far more work than most people realise. If you already have one, though, it’s worth knowing that their bedding can be recycled in the garden waste bin. That goes for other vegetarian animals, too – our guinea pig Marcel is becoming a keen recycler with our son’s help! If you’re starting a compost bin this spring, remember it can also go in there and help your plants out later in the year.
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Easter decorations are becoming more and more popular. If you fancy festooning your house this year, go for trinkets that you can keep and use year after year. You can even make your own – salt dough and handblown eggs make beautiful, delicate family favourites – enlist little hands to help with the painting!

Hope you find my tips helpful – as promised, you’ve got all the way to the end without a single egg pun! I was going to sneak in an Easter rabbit joke, but I realised nobunny would carrot all. 

Happy Easter!