Out with the old and in with the new

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Some of our Christmas traditions are a bit strange, when you think about it – like bringing a tree indoors and dressing it up! It’s even stranger when you think that all those real trees have to be thrown out in January.

Luckily, the wonderful people at St Helena Hospice are one step ahead and are already inviting people to register for their Colchester Treecycle scheme. 

For a suggested donation of £7.50, they will collect your real tree from your home on Saturday 6 January. They’ve covered postcode areas CO1 to CO9 for years and are now expanding to CO13 too. All you need to do is registerbefore noon on 4 January to receive the service. Donations go to the hospice, which supports local people with incurable illnesses and their families. 

I’ve already got some presents to go under my tree. On Saturday, my son came downstairs with his yearly Christmas wish list. Father Christmas and I have reviewed it, and although we agreed that he probably won’t be getting the “pet octopus” that he asked for, the rest of the Christmas shopping and wrapping has now begun! 

Some of his new toys involve batteries, whichI’m sure he’ll wear out pretty quickly. I prefer reusable ones – recharging saves me a trip to dispose of them and are much cheaper in the long run. Disposable batteries can’t be put in your black bin or sacks, because they’re hazardous and can leak toxic chemicals. If you have some, look for a battery container at your local library to dispose of them safely. Many supermarkets take them too.  

My own wishlist is much less exciting… I’m hoping for a new electric toothbrush! It might surprise you to hear that the old one, which broke recently, won’t have to go in the bin. You might not think of toasters, hair straighteners or music players as recyclable, because they contain so many different materials. However, many libraries in Essex have pink bins where you can recycle what’s called “small WEEE” (I’ll try not to make any jokes – it stands for Waste Electrical & Electronic Equipment).  

Everything in those bins gets dismantled and, wherever possible, used again. Electronics are full of complicated, expensive parts that can either be reused or broken up and recycled for the materials. That goes for broken Christmas lights too.

The WEEE bins are only for small things that can be easily carried, but if you’ve got larger electronics, you can take them to the Recycling Centre or book a bulky collection.

All this shopping and planning is putting me in the festive mood – I’m really looking forward to Christmas this year, even if it isn’t going to involve a real live octopus! How are your preparations going?